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  1. #101
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    How to Make Contraband: A Guide for Delinquent Girls is the comic my sister, Erin Wolfe, wrote about her two weeks in the Clackamas County Jail. It's a very short 'zine, covering a few types of contraband, from simple sewing equipment to basic jailhouse tattoos (the crappy ones with the dots). If you're interested in buying one, PM me for details.
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  2. #102
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    Gotham Central, Vol. 3: Unresolved Targets collects two stories: "Soft Targets," issues #12 through #15, and "Unresolved," issues #19 through #22. It's pretty hefty at eight issues, but I instead bought Gotham Central, Book 2: Jokers and Madmen, and got issues #11 through #22 for only $1.50 more. Also included are issue #11, a one-off, and the "Life is Full of Disappointments" story, which is comprised of issues #16 through #18.



    Gotham Central, like always, is a gritty mystery-detective drama. The scenes are dark, and the storylines last three or four issues. I don't know why so many issues are missing from the TPBs, though. I really couldn't see any decrease in quality between the comics included in the TPBs and the ones that weren't. Excellent, recommended comic. No, it's not as good as Half a Life, but then again, what is? ****1/2

  3. #103
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    I got a little antsy in finding out what happens to Renee Montoya, the police officer who was outed in Half a Life, so I picked up The Question: Five Books of Blood (Crime Bible: The Five Lessons of Blood, issues #1 through #5) by Greg Rucka, one of the primary authors of Gotham Central, as well as of Batwoman and Whiteout. He has a knack for writing the lesbian protagonist, and Five Books of Blood sees Montoya off the force and taking over as the new version of the Question.



    I was quite taken with this graphic novel; it features The Crime Bible, or a Bible for those touched by the mark of Cain, like in Hermann Hesse's Demian, and I think that's to its undoing. Don't get me wrong, Rucka pens some great action sequences, but if you're going to pay homage to LaVey and Hesse, you're going to draw comparisons to LaVey and Hesse, both of whom were superior writers. Montoya, as the Question, faces the five trials: "Deceit," "Lust," "Greed," "Murder" and finally "The Parable of the Faceless." This is heavy stuff, and it's sad that it's out of print to my knowledge. Pick up a used copy, if you can. ****1/2

  4. #104
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Blue Beetle, Vol. 2: Blue Diamond is the second and final collection of Blue Beetle comics in the New 52 era. It stars Jamie Reyes as the Blue Beetle, a young teen coming to grips with his powers. I really liked the first TPB of The Blue Beetle, and I finally got around to reading the second TPB. It includes nine issues - #0 and #8 through #16. There are multiple tie-ins to other comics, and at the end of one issue, it says to read Red Lanterns to find out more about one character, and to read issue #9 of Green Lantern Corps to find out what happens with another character. Further, to fully understand the TPB, you need to find a copy of Justice League International Annual issue #1. I'll leave it up to your imaginations as to how to do that.


    I read:
    • Blue Beetle issues #8 through #11
    • Justice League International issue #12 (not included)
    • Blue Beetle issue #12
    • Justice League International Annual issue #1 (not included, and somewhat confusing if you don't follow Justice League International)
    • Blue Beetle issue #0
    • Blue Beetle issues #13 through #16


    Yes, there are tie-ins, and you can enjoy this TPB without reading Justice League International issue #12 and Justice League International Annual #1. I thought Blue Diamond was a really solid effort, and I'm pleased to find out that the adventures of Jamie Reyes are continued in Threshold, another series in the New 52. There are a few problems with the Spanish slang, as others have pointed out, but the TPB is very engaging, and I give it a high recommendation. ****1/4

  5. #105
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    I read Threshold, Vol 1: The Hunted purely because I'm a Blue Beetle fan. When Blue Beetle was cancelled, the character and storyline were spun off into Threshold, and I think to fully appreciate Threshold, you should read the Blue Beetle run of 17 comics. The Hunted collects issues #1 through #8 of Threshold, plus Green Lantern New Guardians Annual #1 (you read that first). "The Hunted" is a game show where people whose mere existence threatens Tenebrian dominion are hunted to the death by everyone on the planet. The main character is a former Green Lantern named Jediah Caul; he's running from the various hunt clubs, until he's found by another contestant, Stealth. Then the two are hunted by the Blue Beetle, himself.



    The focus is on Caul instead of Reyes, I found to my dismay, but I really liked a number of cameo appearances, and the characters in general are more-than-competently realized. It really isn't that bad, structure-wise, compared with other TPBs in the New 52, but despite how well it is crafted, it dragged a little bit for me. ***3/4 because it is good, and because there weren't any annoying tie-ins. It was a little hard for me to get into Green Lanterns New Guardians Annual #1 because I haven't read much of New Guardians, but it did kill a good hour or two.

  6. #106
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Tough one. My favorite comic books characters are non-super-hero types. Chester Brown, Joe Matt, Milo Manara, Rutu Modan, Marjane Satrapi and Seth are among my favorite writers. I might go with Green Lantern (no one particular variety) because of the grandiose nature of the comic, but I haven't really liked the more recent Green Lantern comics. Batman's up there, as is Renee Montoya, who was a cop in Gotham Central that eventually became The Question. I wouldn't pick Montoya because there's so little of her out there. I'm going to throw a name at you; one of my favorite characters is Deadshot, the assassin who never misses. He's sort of a hero in Suicide Squad's last two volumes.



    Favorite villain? Easy. Lucy from Peanuts.


  7. #107
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    Batwoman, Vol. 2: To Drown the World collects issues #6 through #11 of Batwoman, and it picks up where Elegy and Hydrology left off. It's a short collection at 144 pages, about half the length of Threshold, Vol. 1, yet around the same price. It's rated Teen +, most likely because of the lesbianism, but there are also some goodies like dead and missing children, so it's alright. Batwoman has turned down an offer to join Batman, Inc. in favor of working for the D.E.O., which is blackmailing her.



    J.H. Williams III is no longer doing the artwork - which is one of the complaints about the series - but I found it more than adequate. To Drown the World is good, but it's not great. It's easy to read and short, a good way to kill 45 minutes or an hour. I'm glad I read it, and I want to read more. ***3/4

  8. #108
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    My stream crapped out for the boxing card on tonight, so I read Batwoman Vol. 3: World's Finest. It collects issues #12, #0 and #13 through #17 of Batwoman, everyone's favorite lesbian caped crusader. Ironically, the original Batwoman was introduced in the 1950s after a book came out saying that the Batman stories were effectively homosexual, as a love interest for Batman. Bat-Girl (not to be confused with Batgirl, A.K.A. Barbara Gordon) was Robin's love interest.



    There was a lot more text in this TPB, and some controversy which I won't get into. What really makes this comic book work is the insertion of Wonder Woman. Batwoman knows she's in over her head, so she gets someone more powerful to work with her. It may sound like a deus ex machina, but it really isn't. This is another solid but not extraordinary effort. ***3/4

  9. #109
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    The Question: Pipeline is a 128-page graphic novel that collects the co-features of issues #854 through #865 of Detective Comics. It sees Renee Montoya as The Question teaming up with Huntress to take down a crime syndicate which reaches around the world.



    Greg Rucka's one of my favorite writers, and I've become quite fond of Renee Montoya, but I didn't like this TPB. It is hokey, the artwork is uninspired, and there's nothing to distinguish it from countless other superhero comics out there. The ending sucked, and it was the opposite of sexy. *3/4

  10. #110
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    Superman, Vol. 1: What Price Tomorrow? is the first TPB in the New 52 rebooting of all D.C. franchises. It collects issues #1 through #6 of Superman, and it features Superman/Clark Kent unsuccessfully trying to bang Lois Lane, which is a bit refreshing. I kinda' missed Clark Kent, the lovable loser. Superman tends to get pretty boring without a weakness, and it's good to see him as a socially awkward alien rather than the leader of the Justice League, married to a hot reporter.



    This was a better-than-average Superman comic. It's nowhere near as good as what Grant Morrison did with the character, and it's nowhere near as bad as it could have been. See, the problem with Superman isn't that he's damn near indestructible; it's his attitude and personality. He's just a good-old farm boy who'd have probably voted for Ronald Reagan back in the 1980s. There is some good in the TPB, like Clark Kent being against a multi-national news organization buying out The Daily Planet. Another thing I liked is how Clark Kent is a champion of the underprivileged. Still, I found this to be a rather weak TPB, with a lot of the better themes undeveloped. **3/4

  11. #111
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    Suicide Squad Vol. 3: Death Is for Suckers is the third TPB in the Suicide Squad series I've been so taken with, and it collects issues #14 through #19 of that publication. As the title of the book intimates, a few characters thought to be dead come back to life. This is a recurring theme in The New 52, one that I haven't been terribly pleased with. Heck, though, that's comic books for ya'. At least the Joker stayed dead for a year. The question is why people are returning from the dead.



    I've heard people say that this is the best book in the Suicide Squad series. In particular, there's an interesting exchange between the Joker and Harley Quinn in issue #15. My main complaint about Death Is for Suckers is that those questions don't get answered, at least in this TPB. What is the deal with King Shark, for instance? I kinda' dug this TPB, though. I got really curious about what's going on, like I did with X-Files and Lost. Deadshot's one of my favorite characters in all of D.C.-dom. ****1/4

  12. #112
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Batwoman, Vol. 4: Blood Is Thick is yet another D.C. TPB. I'm getting kinda' sick of how isomorphous the artwork is in The New 52. You can't really tell one from another. Don't get me wrong; the penciling and coloring are fantastic, and if anything, Batwoman breaks away from typical D.C. artwork, at least a little bit. Blood Is Thick collects issues #18 through #24 of Batwoman, and it's the final collection featuring J.H. Williams as writer, as he left D.C. over editorial differences. In fact, Batwoman issue #25 was completed, but trashed for some reason.



    I do like Batwoman, and I have to say that the quality of the TPBs is excellent. While I see some of the D.C. TPBs going down in quality as they go on, Batwoman just keeps getting better and better. This is one of her best adventures, but it simply stops at issue #24, which is a bit of a letdown. I don't think that D.C. intended this TPB to end in a cliffhanger, but since J.H. Williams III left the comic (to be replaced by Marc Andrews), they decided to scrap Williams's issue #25 and simply go on with Andrews. Blood Is Thick is great, and I highly recommend the series. ****1/2

  13. #113
    Administrator i had sex with your mum's Avatar
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    can't you try to upset people instead of posting about comic books? or deliberately draw criticism by acting all superior, or something?

    something, but comics, please.

    oh shit, ok, I see now. you're posting endlessly in an ill-frequented thread, to draw criticism. haha the irony. got me.
    'Shut your faggot mouth boy. You have no clue as to who the fuck you are addressing.'

  14. #114
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    No doubt this forum needs some controversy. I'm just not the "Rubio MHS" of 2001 anymore. I wear Hawaiian-style shirts and flip-flops every day. I work, I don't drink, and I have friends. I've even got a date tonight. My cat got bitten by another cat, and I got a $437 vet bill. He was walking on three legs for a while, but he's back on four. When he was badly injured, the other cats hissed at him, but now they're cool. It's a defense mechanism to weed out cats that won't live.

    I post about comic books in the hope that members will download them, and perhaps even buy them. I think comics are an excellent alternative to television and movies, as they don't require much deep thought, and they're bright and colorful. I also think that comic books were ahead of the curve when it comes to more modern characterizations. Who can forget Michael Keaton's Batman throwing petty criminals off the roofs of skyscrapers? There's really something to them.

  15. #115
    Administrator i had sex with your mum's Avatar
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    interesting - and sorry to hear about your cat.

    good luck on the date. she fit? you feeling confident?
    'Shut your faggot mouth boy. You have no clue as to who the fuck you are addressing.'

  16. #116
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    She's fairly nice looking, has a union job and seems rather intelligent. I got a little turned off when she said she went to see Heaven is Real in the theaters.

  17. #117
    Administrator i had sex with your mum's Avatar
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    but it's based on an incredible true story. I'm not sure what the problem is.

    ah well, hope it goes ok.
    'Shut your faggot mouth boy. You have no clue as to who the fuck you are addressing.'

  18. #118
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Oh, I've dated Christian, Jewish, Buddhist and Muslim girls before; my Facebook feed is filled with "inspiring" quotes. It just looked like such a stupid movie.

  19. #119
    Don't insult what you can't understand. God is the path to knowledge and wisdom.

  20. #120
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Well, the girl I was going out with has to work late. It's tough to find a time to meet because she works a lot, and I've been known to punch the ol' time clock on occasion. Maybe this weekend.

    Deathstroke, Vol. 1: Legacy is up next. It contains issues #1 through #6 of Deathstroke, the story of an ageing mercenary. Gray hair, eye patch, willingness to prove himself. A secret briefcase, Nth metal, metahumans. Oh, and did I mention that nearly everyone in the story is trying to kill him? I got interested in Deathstroke after reading that it's authored by Kyle Higgens, who wrote the Nightwing series I liked so much.



    This is a lot simpler than Nightwing, and it's good-old blood-and-guts storytelling. Deathstroke is mean, often killing people for only perceived slights. The artwork, like that of all the New 52 comics, is great. I gave The Flash, Vol. 1: Move Forward nearly *** because its artwork was so spectacular, despite its confusing storyline. This is good stuff, and for what it is - slightly-more-than-mindless violence - I liked it. Arnold Schwarzenegger should get back on the juice and do a movie about it. ****

  21. #121
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stealth View Post
    Where do you stand on the whole female versus male protagonist? Do you have a preference?
    In comics, I generally like both. In general, the target audience is men, so it's easier to relate to Batwoman, Renee Montoya and Carrie Stetko because they're running around, investigating crimes and saving the world than it is to Alison Bechdel having a troubled relationship with her mom.
    Quote Originally Posted by stealth View Post
    I watched all of kevin smith's movies in the last 5 days or so, man does he love comics.

    Have you ever watched comic book men on AMC? I surprisingly enjoy the show, though I think it might have gotten cancelled.
    I've had cable TV for two out of the past 22 years. I generally don't watch TV unless it's shirtless guys beating the heck out of each other (or pretending to).

  22. #122
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    I'll probably get an Amazon Prime membership when I go back to school.

  23. #123
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    What's so great about Amazon Prime as opposed to regular old Amazon?

    Also, Deathstroke is awesome and by far my ATF villain.
    Quote Originally Posted by Saunion View Post
    Is that any worse than the way our women dress and act? The "sexual revolution" of the 60's was/is a failure. Women have proven they can not be trusted to control their own sexuality. The burden falls on men to maintain civilization and decency....by force if necessary.

  24. #124
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    I'm desperately bored, and up for my third TPB of the day (I know, shoot me; my plans got cancelled last minute). I was drawn to The Movement Vol. 1: Class Warfare because I'd heard good things about Gail Simone, who also writes Teen Titans and Batgirl. The Movement is the story of a group of teenaged super-heroes in Coral City who rise up against corruption. At its worst, Gotham City itself was second to Coral City as the most corrupt in the nation, at least in the New 52 universe. Class Warfare includes issues #1 through #6 of The Movement.



    Class Warfare does touch upon a few current issues; it's like the Occupy movement, but the teens can start earthquakes and command rats. My main criticism is that it seems too aware of its "Teen +" rating, pushing the boundaries of what is acceptable just far enough. You're hardly going to see Milo-Manara-level gratuitousness in a D.C. comic. One complaint I've heard about the series is that it's a group of unlike-minded individuals looking for group unity, but I see this as a strength. It's boring to see people with super powers generally getting along except for arguing about who's in charge. ****

  25. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by stealth View Post
    well prime used to be way better, student price was 40 bucks a year and you get free 2 day shipping across the board, and could pay 3.99 for overnight shipping

    Bonus is they have just about everything Netflix does, and because it's amazon slowly but surely the library was getting better than Netflix.

    They just jacked the price up, but if you order a lot from amazon it's still worth it. It's just not the amazing deal it used to be.
    ty
    Quote Originally Posted by Saunion View Post
    Is that any worse than the way our women dress and act? The "sexual revolution" of the 60's was/is a failure. Women have proven they can not be trusted to control their own sexuality. The burden falls on men to maintain civilization and decency....by force if necessary.

  26. #126
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    The Left Bank Gang is another 48-page cartoon by Jason, the author of I Killed Adolf Hitler. It has the same style of artwork, but it features F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ezra Pound, James Joyce and Ernest Hemingway as struggling cartoonists on Paris's Left Bank in the 1920s. They're all broke, so they hatch a scheme to get some money, and of course it turns out awfully.



    I love cartoons like this. My bed seemed covered by unread books and unplayed musical instruments today; I felt a bit of hubris. The Left Bank Gang is just an all-around joy. Paris in the 1920s was a magical time for English literature, but we often forget that those writers lived miserable lives at times, stricken by poverty, alcoholism and nagging wives. This bears reading and re-reading. ****1/2

  27. #127
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    I was never drawn to All Star Western because the Western genre is a thing of the past. Why watch people ride horses when you can watch them chase in cars? Similarly, the cop genre might be dying because why would you watch people chasing cars when you could see them chase in giant robots? But the premise behind All Star Western Vol. 1: Guns and Gotham (issues #1 through #6 of All Star Western) is pretty interesting. You take a decent character in Jonah Hex, put him in 1870s Gotham and pair him up with Amadeus Arkham, a pioneering criminal psychologist.



    Issues #1 through #3 are a Crime Bible story set in Gotham with Dr. Arkham, and issues #4 through #6 see Hex and Arkham solving a case of missing children. Each comic has a mini-comic afterward, and all the mini-comics are included in this collection, which runes 192 pages. I usually don't read much after ten, but this TPB kept me nearly to midnight with its tales of Hex/Arkham and the Wild West. I'm very pleased with this comic, and it gets my highest recommendation. ****3/4

  28. #128
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    All Star Western Vol. 2: The War of Lords and Owls is the second TPB in the All Star Western series (issues #7 through #12, including the mini-comics), again featuring Jonah Hex and Amadeus Arkham. The TPB starts with them in New Orleans, going against the August 7, an "anarchist" gang that blows up mills and factories where immigrants work. I would be remiss if I didn't point out that traditionally, most anarchists were immigrants, rebelling against the twin authorities of the U.S. government and immigrant street gangs. Then the pair return to Gotham.



    The story gets a little muddled with too many enemies - the Crime Bible group and the Court of Owls - but the Owls manage to stay just enough on the outskirts to make this TPB a hit, in my view. I love all the characters, including the ancestors of Gotham's more famous denizens, Bruce Wayne and the Penguin. War of Lords and Owls does get a bit formulaic with its three-issue storyline arcs, but that's what we tend to see in the Western genre. Issues tend to get wrapped up in an hour or two of screentime, but there are recurring themes and enemies. Again, highly recommended. ****3/4

  29. #129
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    Batman/Superman, Vol. 1: Cross World collects issues #1 through #4 of Batman/Superman plus issue #23.1 Darkseid of Justice League. I know, Batman and Superman meeting for the first time has been done to death - and it includes an issue I already got in Justice League, Vol. 4: The Grid - but I read it, anyway. Greg Pak's a good writer, and the artwork is absolutely gorgeous.



    I read it blind, that is, without reading any reviews. I could still understand it, but I'd have had a fuller grasp of what was going on if I'd read the basic premise: Superman and Batman from Earth-1 meet Superman and Batman from Earth-2. It comes together at the end, but I got a little confused at first. It really is a good story, although I didn't reread Justice League issue #23.1. My only complaint would be that it only contains about 100 pages of new material, but if you're going to wrap up a story in four issues, why include more? ****

  30. #130
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    Earth 2, Vol. 3: Battle Cry collects issues #13 through #15, #15.1 and #16 of Earth 2, along with Earth 2 Annual #1 (you read this first). I've covered the first two Earth 2 TPBs, but I don't know how much I've gone into the concept. Earth-2 is a parallel world where instead of the Justice League or Justice League of America, there's the Justice Society of America.



    I was disappointed in this volume. The artwork was brilliant, and the action scenes intense, but it was too much of a headache figuring out who the good guys are and who the bad guys are. That's a bit of the charm of this TPB, but I would've had a fuller appreciation for it if I'd simply followed the comic month-by-month instead of picking up the TPBs every eight or nine months. Not recommended in TPB form. **

  31. #131
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    Catwoman, Vol. 1: The Game collects issues #1 through #6 of the New 52 version of Catwoman. Selina Kyle, A.K.A. Catwoman, has her apartment invaded and bombed. She escapes only with her cats, but she needs to find a place to stay, and work. Throw in Batman, and you've got yourself a story, or rather, a franchise. One might argue that Batman is spread too thin, with Batwoman, Catwoman, Justice League and all the various Bat-stories, but he's good here, and just enough in the background to make it interesting. The focus is always on Catwoman, and her twisted character.



    I was immediately drawn in by the artwork on the cover. Catwoman is a slut, we get it, hence the "Teen +" rating. This is mindless entertainment, but it's entertainment. Each issue makes you want to read the next issue to see how she gets out of the jam she's in. There's a tiny bit of resolution in the final issue of the TPB, but there's always a cliffhanger. I like the series so far. Well done. ****

  32. #132
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    I bought Green Arrow: Year One for the Kindle for something like $3.99 last year, and never read it. Well, today I'm reading it. Year One is the 2007 origin story of Green Arrow upon which the television series is loosely based. It's a six-issue limited series detailing Oliver Queen, the millionaire doofus. That doofus gets stuck on an island and has to defend himself, and he emerges as the Green Arrow.



    This is good stuff. There's a lot of the character development that we often see missing from even top comics. Year One would be an excellent TPB if it weren't so formulaic and goody-goody. Still, it's a fun way to kill an hour, and I recommend it. ****

  33. #133
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    I got a very dilapidated, 15-year-old copy of Chester Brown's The Little Man - Short Strips 1980-1995 in the mail yesterday. The asshole on Amazon.com said it was in "like new" condition. It consists of short comics of length varying from one to 10 pages of disparate quality.



    Chester Brown has grown into one of my favorite sequential artists; I own four of his books and have read a fifth, along with a few issues of Yummy Fur. It does get better as it goes along, but his work in his teens and early 20s is decidedly subpar compared with Paying for It, Louis Riel and my favorite, I Never Liked You. Still, me not reading this would be like a heavy metal fan not buying Black Sabbath's debut album. ****, mostly for the final comics.

  34. #134
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    Catwoman, Vol. 2: Dollhouse collects issues #7 through #12 of Catwoman, and for some reason, I keep reading this junk instead of the better work that's out there. I don't know, but I like the New 52's consistent art quality, and there are a few compelling characters. I never planned on reading Catwoman, but here I am. Catwoman is attracted to danger, and it's starting to hurt her and the people around her. In this TPB, she plays super-hero, looking out for missing children and such.



    Dollhouse was a little slow in the beginning, but it sure picked up. Catwoman is one of the better New 52 characters that I've read, and I've read quite a bit. I really liked the ending, which was a bit of a twist, and I'm looking forward to reading the next TPB. Overall, it's a ***3/4 book, not great shakes, but worth reading.

  35. #135
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Bored. Reading Batgirl, Vol. 1: The Darkest Reflection. Issues #1 through #6 of Batgirl, and she's got her legs back. In The Darkest Reflection, she's up against the Mirror, who has a kill list with both Barbara Gordon and Batgirl on it. A few people have complained that Batgirl can walk again. In The Killing Joke, she was shot by the Joker and has spent the past 20 or 25 years in a wheelchair as Oracle, in the Batman, Teen Titans and J.L.A. comics.



    Barbara Gordon, as the hacker Oracle, was a compelling character, and it took quite a bit of doing to make her into Batgirl again. She's 95 pounds and coming off years in the chair; her van still has a wheelchair ramp. I just didn't get the Mirror's motivation. Sure, he's crazy, but I generally like my mentally-ill supervillains to be motivated by good old greed, revenge, gluttony and the like. Gretel is the antagonist for issues #5 and #6, and she's slightly better, but still no great shakes. The TPB is readable, well-drawn and fun, but it's got too many holes for me to give it more than ***.

  36. #136
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    I sometimes wonder if I'm depressed, or if I am, how serious that depression is. I suppose that if I still get enjoyment out of comic books, that's something. Yeah, I read Batgirl, Vol. 2: Knightfall Descends, which includes issues #7 through #12, #0 and #13 of Batgirl, in that order. There are a number of overlapping storyline arcs, which is good, but although one of the stories resolves itself, too much is happening for this to be a one-off TPB.



    This is head-and-shoulders above The Darkest Reflection, but there are still a few issues I have with the book. Batgirl is a solo act, so where does she get money for Batarangs and kevlar suits? When does she train? And where's the mention of her spine possibly deteriorating, which came up in Vol. 1? Aside from that, this TPB features some of the best villains I've read in a while, and Gail Simone really stepped up her writing for these issues. Recommended. ****

  37. #137
    That was weak, bae. I expect better from the Forum Savior.

  38. #138
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Lock simply isn't intentionally funny.

  39. #139
    Petunia's Avatar
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    Wtf was that?

  40. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by lock8.3 View Post
    we've been over this countless times, baes. what on earth has ever gave any of you the impression i am here for your enjoyment?
    I'm fairly certain no one has any expectations of you.

  41. #141
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Batgirl, Vol. 3: Death of the Family collects Batgirl #14 through #19, the oft-included Batman #17 (between issues #16 and #17), Batgirl Annual #1 and a story from Young Romance #1. It clocks in at 224 pages, pretty generous for a New 52 TPB, but of course, it's more expensive. Death of the Family is a long, drawn-out storyline that crosses over series, including Suicide Squad, Batman, Batgirl, Catwoman, Batman and Robin, Nightwing, Teen Titans, Detective Comics and Red Hood and the Outlaws. It's available in one large book, but each comic has its own unique aspect of the story. Batgirl is blackmailed into marrying the Joker.



    There was just enough tension in this TPB to keep me reading. I wasn't really interested in the "Death of the Family" story, which I'd already seen resolved in Nightwing, Vol. 3: Death of the Family. Overall, this is mid-level entertainment, readable and fun, but nothing special. ***1/4

  42. #142
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Batman, Vol. 1: The Court of Owls is the first Batman TPB in the New 52 era, and it collects issues #1 through #7 of Batman. I've been a little slow to pick up D.C.'s flagship series in the New 52, mostly because the two storylines, the "Court of Owls" and "Death of the Family" are treated in numerous other comics. I was happy to learn that while the other comics merely hint at the Owls, Batman goes into their full history.



    Let's see. This TPB is good, and the art is great. It makes me want to read all of the New 52 TPBs out there, see how the Owls turn out as an enemy. I've already read about Batman's triumph over the Court of the Owls in Nightwing, Vol. 2, and All Star Western treats the Owls as well. I've spoken out against other cross-overs, but I'm starting to like this one, and the presentation in this TPB is simply superb. ****1/2

  43. #143
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Batman, Vol. 2: The City of Owls collects issues #8 through #12 of Batman (32 pages each), along with Batman Annual #1 (48 pages), and it concludes the "Owls" storyline, for now. There's quite a bit of dialogue, and you don't really know if the main antagonist is who he claims to be. Issue #12 revisits issue #7 from the first TPB, about a girl who helps Batman. Batman Annual #1 is a Mr. Freeze story.



    This is another great collection, although it's far from perfect. The dialogue is excessive and rambling. The main story wraps up at the end of issue #11, and while I like the codas, they're entirely unnecessary, with Batman only a minor character. The artwork is again spectacular, and they're really putting their best foot forward for this series. ****1/4

  44. #144
    Petunia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lock8.3 View Post
    bae, are you really this old, retarded, or blind?

    seriously, bae. a few posts up:





    please consult your forum chaperon prior to posting, bae
    Sarcasm from This Fucking Place and I can't imagine why me wondering wtf you were trying to do with that post was a call for you to be entertaining. I'd settle for you being less of a dipshit, if that's any comfort.

  45. #145
    Quote Originally Posted by Fists of Palm View Post
    Batman, Vol. 1: The Court of Owls is the first Batman TPB in the New 52 era, and it collects issues #1 through #7 of Batman. I've been a little slow to pick up D.C.'s flagship series in the New 52, mostly because the two storylines, the "Court of Owls" and "Death of the Family" are treated in numerous other comics. I was happy to learn that while the other comics merely hint at the Owls, Batman goes into their full history.



    Let's see. This TPB is good, and the art is great. It makes me want to read all of the New 52 TPBs out there, see how the Owls turn out as an enemy. I've already read about Batman's triumph over the Court of the Owls in Nightwing, Vol. 2, and All Star Western treats the Owls as well. I've spoken out against other cross-overs, but I'm starting to like this one, and the presentation in this TPB is simply superb. ****1/2
    Don't waste your time. The second volume wasn't nearly as good.

  46. #146
    Quote Originally Posted by Fists of Palm View Post
    Batman, Vol. 2: The City of Owls collects issues #8 through #12 of Batman (32 pages each), along with Batman Annual #1 (48 pages), and it concludes the "Owls" storyline, for now. There's quite a bit of dialogue, and you don't really know if the main antagonist is who he claims to be. Issue #12 revisits issue #7 from the first TPB, about a girl who helps Batman. Batman Annual #1 is a Mr. Freeze story.



    This is another great collection, although it's far from perfect. The dialogue is excessive and rambling. The main story wraps up at the end of issue #11, and while I like the codas, they're entirely unnecessary, with Batman only a minor character. The artwork is again spectacular, and they're really putting their best foot forward for this series. ****1/4
    There's no accounting for taste.

  47. #147
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by This Fucking Place View Post
    Don't waste your time. The second volume wasn't nearly as good.
    I would agree with that assessment, although the first volume was so good, and I read it in such proximity to when I read the second volume, that the greatness followed through. I think that the main issue I'd have with the New 52 comics is that they're meant to be read in succession, rather than TPB by TPB. Even though it had only a tangential connection to the rest of the story, I kinda' liked Batman Annual #1, with Mr. Freeze. It was a good comic.

  48. #148
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Perhaps, but unlike you and your "that gay kiss wuz staged" argument, I've provided evidence throughout this topic that the New 52 comics focus less on TPBs.

  49. #149
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    You're boring. I'm going to ignore you now.

  50. #150
    Quote Originally Posted by lock8.3 View Post
    ad hominem. you fail, bae.

  51. #151
    Quote Originally Posted by lock8.3 View Post
    Fallacy: Ad Hominem

    An Ad Hominem is a general category of fallacies in which a claim or argument is rejected on the basis of some irrelevant fact about the author of or the person presenting the claim or argument.

  52. #152
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    True. If one reads carefully, I don't exactly reject Bae's claim. I just think he's too boring to deal with.

  53. #153
    Administrator i had sex with your mum's Avatar
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    lock, he's already fucking mentioned he's feeling under the weather. now you're hassling him over fuck all. turn in, christ.

  54. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fists of Palm View Post
    True. If one reads carefully, I don't exactly reject Bae's claim. I just think he's too boring to deal with.
    So, being a statement of your subjective feelings, it's factual in nature, not ad hominem.

  55. #155
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lock8.3 View Post
    so you agree with me that you were wrong. good to know, bae.
    Strawman fallacy. You fail.

  56. #156
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    You messed up your quotes.

  57. #157
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Lazarus One: Family is a short TPB at 96 pages (and under $7), consisting of issues #1 through #4 of Lazarus by Greg Rucka, who was responsible for titles such as Whiteout, Gotham Central, Batwoman and Whiteout. It's the story of a futuristic feudal society where Forever Carlyle, the Lazarus, lives. She doesn't mind dying, but all the killing is starting to wear on her. There are three types of population, family, serf and waste. For each family member, there are a thousand serfs, and for each serf, there are a thousand wastes.



    I'll say it. Dystopian future dramas with quiet heroes have been done to death. Forever Carlyle is a badass, which is always good, but Lazarus isn't a hack-em-up scene out of a video game. There are negotiations, treachery and mystery abound; the reader doesn't really know what's in store for him as the series progresses. Mark June 15th on your calendars, because that's when the next Lazarus TPB comes out. ****1/4

  58. #158
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    I found Wonder Woman, Vol. 2: Guts on my Kindle. I couldn't even remember reading Vol. 1: Blood until seeing the cover and vaguely remembering ordering both TPBs for $3.99 each. Vol. 2: Guts collects issues #7 through #12 of Wonder Woman, and it details Wonder Woman's trip through the Underworld. Apparently, she pissed off one god too many in Vol. 1: Blood.



    I kinda' liked the story of Wonder Woman going to Hell and then to Mt. Olympus to save Zola and Zola's unborn child; the accompanying artwork is more than capable. I'm giving the collection only ***1/4, though, because it's mostly lacking in drama, tension and characterization. I also didn't see much of Wonder Woman's motivation for saving Zola. I mean, there's something to be said for a hero risking life and limb to save someone they don't really know, but if you're going to build a series around a recurring damsel-in-distress, there's got to be something there. Mickey saved Minnie because he fancied her. Same with Popeye and Olive Oyl, and countless other stories.

  59. #159
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    What I Did by Jason is a collection of three of his short books, Hey, Wait, Sshhhh! and The Iron Wagon. He uses his trademark cartooning style of stiff talking dogs and birds. Instead off driving cars, the adults walk on stilts. He has his own unique style, but of the five books of his I've read, each one has its own signature.



    Hey, Wait is my favorite story of the collection; it really got to me. It's funny, irreverent and tragic. This is exactly what I look for when I read cartoons. Sshhhh! is perhaps the most famous of the collection, a man's life without any dialogue or narration, just images of bird-men. The Iron Wagon is a comic version of a 1909 Norwegian novel of the same name. I just loved this collection. ***** for Hey, Wait, ****1/4 for Sshhhh! and ***** for The Iron Wagon. ***** for the collection of the three.

  60. #160
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Almost Silent is another collection of Jason's work, putting together four books: Meow, Baby is a collection of short strips. Tell Me Something is a short graphic novel about a rich girl who falls in love with a poet. You Can't Get There From Here is a "Bride of Frankenstein" story involving a love triangle. The Living and the Dead is a love story set amid the zombie apocalypse. There's very little narration or dialogue, and the books are sometimes hard to follow.



    This is brilliant stuff, but a little taxing on the brain. It isn't easy to read, but that's a reflection of life not being easy. I made a mistake by reading all of these books in succession, but still, Almost Silent is not as strong a collection as What I Did, although I did like The Living and the Dead, and Meow, Baby had me laughing out loud at times. ****1/4

  61. #161
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    'Got a new mattress. It used to belong to my sister and her girlfriend, so it's pretty nice. Two or three inches thicker than my last mattress, which I got at the Salvation Army when I moved out seven years ago. I'm as averse to getting out of it as I was my last mattress. Oh, I still get up and around on occasion; my mother came over for lunch, and my half-sister was here this afternoon for an hour or two. It's just that on Sundays, I sleep away most of the day. I've had a good 1.4 or 1.5 grams of caffeine today, and that keeps me going. I spent a couple of hours singing and playing my ukulele.

    Red Hood and the Outlaws, Vol. 1: REDemption collects issues #6, #1 through #5 and #7 of Red Hood and the Outlaws, in that order. Red Hood is Jason Todd, a former Robin. He was killed off after a phone survey determined whether he'd live or die. Rumors have it that someone rigged his phone to call 100 times (at a cost of $0.50 per call), thus tipping the balance to Jason Todd dying. He came back to life 15 or 20 years later and was evil. Now he's good, I guess, and he has sidekicks. One's named after Roy Harper, the recently outed pederast, and the other is a nymphomaniac from another planet. Awkwardness entails.



    Jason Todd is brash, arrogant and foolhardy; he made a terrible Robin, but he makes a good Red Hood. Again, though, I don't see enough motivation behind what Red Hood and his gang do. Some smoke chick pops up and mutters something about a fortress, and off they go. Why do these three people hang out? Why did Jason Todd save Roy Harper in Qurac? Why does Starfire go on all these very public adventures when she's intent on hiding out from humanity?

    This TPB sucks because while Jason Todd is pretty interesting, doing all that Batman is afraid to do, we don't get a strong motivation as to why the heroes become heroes. We don't live in a primitive society where stories of people acting heroic for the heck of it are common; that shit was passe 2500 years ago. And this is weak writing. Don't get me wrong, this isn't a * review, because there is some good in REDemption, but it certainly doesn't outweigh the bad. **

  62. #162
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Getting a new mattress really fucked up my sleep. Finally, at 3:00 A.M., I took 200 mg. of Trazodone and three anti-histamines, crashing on the sofa. My ex- texted me just before 8:00 A.M. about some bullshit, so I walked to the store for a cigarillo, some energy drinks and a snack. I got almost to the store before I realized that I wasn't walking straight. Oh, well. What're the cops going to do, arrest me for walking while intoxicated? And while we're on the subject of anti-histamines, what the fuck is up with this? I took Klonopin for three years, and I finally stopped. My doctor gave me anti-histamines instead, up to three a day, to relax and chill out. What am I, in middle school?

    Anyhoo, I read Y - The Last Man, Vol. 3: One Small Step, the further adventures of Yorick, Ampersand, Agent 355 and an ever-increasing cast of characters. In this issue, which is slightly longer than its predecessors at 166 pages and seven issues, two more men are entered into the fray, a Russian and an American astronaut. But will they survive the plague which has killed off every male animal on Earth?



    This series keeps getting better and better, and I'm glad I have all 10 books in paperback. Some days, I just don't feel like reading comics. I'm too tired, I have too much to do or I didn't sleep well. In today's case, all three. This is a very strong outing, and the series keeps getting better and better. It makes me feel like popping a few tabs of caffeine and reading Volume 4. ****3/4

  63. #163
    I should get back to Y.

  64. #164
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Brian K. Vaughn also created Saga, which has hit the comic book world by storm. Craig/Tam-Tam says it's shit, but I bought the first volume, anyway.

  65. #165
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    I've been awake over 12 hours, but I've gotten almost nothing done. Work's been slow, and all I have to keep me sane is my collection of comics. I keep plugging away at them because I need something to do besides teaching a few lessons and watching Cinco for a few hours. Oh, and playing my ukulele. I sometimes wonder if eight hours of sleep is what the body needs. Eight hours seemed so little last night.

    Saga, Vol. 1 won a number of awards when it debuted last year. It's the story of a family; the parents are from opposing sides of a galactic war, and the baby, a girl, has her father's horns and her mother's wings. The ones with the horns wield magic and swords, while the ones with the wings use guns. Everyone's trying to kill them, of course, as they trapse through bizarre landscapes and otherworldly terrains.



    I can see why some people don't like it; it's cutesy, and the cool factor is very low. But you know what? This is a comic that isn't for teenagers, but rather for people who've had kids and been married. It's definitely for a more mature audience. Saga is an emotional rollercoaster, not unlike Y - The Last Man. It's written by a man in his late 30s, and it's for people around that age. I like it, and I plan on reading the next few volumes. ****

  66. #166
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    I took a stim-pill and decided to finally tackle Bone, Book 1: Escape From Boneville, the first of nine books in the massive, one-volume, 1344-page edition of Bone by Jeff Smith. It's also sold in 10 individual volumes; Book 9 is split into two volumes. It's the story of three sentient creatures called "Bones," and they're all cousins. They've recently been exiled from Boneville, and they're making their way through the world. It's a very old-fashioned comic, looking like something out of the 1950s.



    Bone is entertainment. It's cute and well drawn, funny and suspenseful. So far, I just don't get what got it 10 Eisner Awards and 11 Harvey Awards. Its appeal is its traditional nature. It won awards for Best Humor series in part because there are so few humor comics these days, which is too bad. ***3/4, but I will try to get through the series.

  67. #167
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    So I took another stim-pill (caffeine, 200 mg.) and read Bone, Book 2: The Great Cow Race. The three Bone cousins are reunited in Barrelhaven, and as the title implies, they're there for the Great Cow Race. Fone Bone is the focus of Book 1, a generic, Mickey-Mouse-type character that plays the lead to his more interesting cousins. Phoney Bone is the rich one, and Smiley Bone is the stupid one. As they reappear in the story, it gets better



    It took me a little under 40 minutes to read Book 2, and I liked it more than Book 1. It was funnier, for one. The Bone cousins get into a lot of trouble, and the expressions on the faces of the people they piss off are priceless. ****

  68. #168
    Ever consider moving to Portland?

  69. #169
    Petunia's Avatar
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    Bone sounds fun.

  70. #170
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by This Fucking Place View Post
    Ever consider moving to Portland?
    My sister lives in Portland.
    Quote Originally Posted by Petunia View Post
    Bone sounds fun.
    It is. First published in 1991, it shows its age. Tam-Tam explained to me that it was quite a bit better than the comics produced at the time, and anyone who's read The Death of Superman knows what he's talking about.

  71. #171
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Not a good night's sleep. I crashed at midnight, but my cat got sick at 1:00 A.M. and puked all over the place. Oh, and I have this miserable fucking Outfox virus on my computer that plays on my computer every morning at 5:00 A.M. Usually, I just turn it off and go back to sleep, but this morning I actually woke up 30 seconds before it went off, like it's a fucking alarm clock. To make matters worse, my clippers went out while I was trimming my beard, and I had to finish with a pair of scissors.

    Bone, Book 3: Eyes of the Storm is the third and final book in the first sequence of Bone books, The Valley, or Vernal Equinox, and it sees the cousins separated again. Phoney and Smiley Bone have debts to pay off from their latest scheme, and Fone Bone prefers to stay with his beloved Thorn and her grandmother. There is, of course, a storm that threatens the Bones and their friends, and two of the characters are plagued by strange dreams.



    This is another solid outing, and I recommend the one-volume edition, which is $29.99 on Amazon.com. Also available are color editions. The individual books are about $10 each, and a one-volume edition of the colored version of Bone costs $80 to $100. It should be noted that the coloring is not done by Jeff Smith, and purists will probably prefer the black-and-white edition, as I do. ****

  72. #172
    Quote Originally Posted by Fists of Palm View Post
    My sister lives in Portland.
    Uke, origami, and comic books. I think you would fit right in up there.

  73. #173
    Petunia's Avatar
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    What's up with the ukulele craze?

  74. #174
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    There have been three "waves" of popularity of the ukulele. First, the 1920s, then the 1950s and finally in the 2000s. It's a nifty instrument, and I started playing after I went on a date with a girl who played it.

  75. #175
    Stone Cold Bursa Sac Feng Shui's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fists of Palm View Post
    There have been three "waves" of popularity of the ukulele. First, the 1920s, then the 1950s and finally in the 2000s. It's a nifty instrument, and I started playing after I went on a date with a girl who played it.

  76. #176
    Administrator i had sex with your mum's Avatar
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    your cat sounds like a fucking liability. maybe you should declaw him and sell him to someone with a game bred dog as practice?

    you could use the money to buy a better cat. hope that helps.

  77. #177
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    You're mean.

  78. #178
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    I'm tired. Just got home. My cat must've gotten over whatever she had last night. I started reading Aquaman, Vol. 4, which just came out yesterday, but I had trouble concentrating. I watched the Bellator and the TNA pay-per-views today, more TV than I usually get in a week. That's what you get when you don't sleep. It's like that line from Fight Club: "you're never fully asleep, but you're never fully awake." I hope I don't go crazy. I'm in a manic cycle now; that explains the insomnia. Going to sleep, I hope.

  79. #179
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    I've got a headache, and I'm tired, but I have a few comics I'd like to read. Aquaman, Vol. 4: Death of a King is the final installation of Geoff Johns's compelling run as the head writer behind Aquaman. If you're only going to read one of the New 52 comics, this should be it, although Suicide Squad and All Star Western are very good. The reason why I'd recommend this series over those two is that it has a recognizable character that everyone knows about. I've given higher ratings to Suicide Squad and All Star Western, but Jonah Hex, Harley Quinn and Deadshot aren't exactly matinee idols.



    Vol. 4 starts with an epilogue to Vol. 3, as issues #17 and #18 were originally scheduled to be a part of the previous volume (Vol. 4 includes #17 through #19 and #21 through #25). Issue #20 isn't included because Aquaman only plays a small role; the rest of the Others go after a skin changer in Arizona. There are several things going on. First, a meta-human named Scavenger is selling Atlantean weaponry to whoever will pay for it. Second, the ancestral king of Atlantis has returned from the Bermuda Triangle.



    There is a lot going on in this TPB, and while it isn't hard to follow, the artwork and headings could be done better. The waters of the Bermuda Triangle look the same as the waters of Atlantis, and the story shifts between the two rapidly. That's not to say that this isn't a beautiful book - the colors are vibrant, and the scenery is top notch - but as much as I love what Geoff Johns has done for Aquaman and so many other characters, this is hardly his best work, and I think he's been spread a little bit too thin. He does tie together a lot of strings in the end, and as much as I didn't like it at first, it's worth reading, and it picks up as it goes along. ***3/4

  80. #180
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    I got another collection by Jason in the mail today, Athos in America. It contains six short stories totaling 196 pages: The Smiling Horse, A Cat From Heaven, The Brain That Wouldn't Virginia Woolf, Tom Waits on the Moon, So Long, Mary Ann and Athos in America.



    This is an excellent collection, better than Almost Silent and nearly as good as What I Did. Jason is at his peak, writing about love, sex, murder and of course severed heads, lots of severed heads. He has a knack for portraying the American gangster movie of the 1930s to 1950s, as well as the entire range of American horror movies. He stamps on top of these his own brand of satire, producing some of the best sequential art in the business. ****3/4

  81. #181
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Bone, Book 4: The Dragonslayer is a real turning point in the nine-book collection. Phoney Bone starts to become more politically powerful, and he shines in that role. Thorn finds out more about her past and her future. And Fone and Smiley find a baby rat creature. Phoney builds on everyone's fears of dragons, but what happens when he actually catches one?



    I'm so glad I stuck with Bone. It takes a little while to establish the characters and their motivations, but once you've fallen in love with them, you'll never stop reading. The artwork is wonderfully detailed except for the Bone cousins, who are rough, cartoony characters, but the facial expressions are timeless. Read this collection. ****1/2

  82. #182
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Sleep began to elude me at 3:00 A.M. I watched T.N.A. wrestling and read Y - The Last Man, Vol. 4: Safeword. Yorick, Dr. Mann, Ampersand and Agent 355 are in Colorado and Arizona now. There are really two halves of the story, the part with Yorick staying with Agent 711, and the part in Arizona, where the three take on a local militia.



    This was another fine outing by Brian K. Vaughan. I was sleepy and didn't necessarily feel like reading, but I stormed through this book like a brick through a plate-glass window. Sure, there's action and suspense, but what really makes this comic work is the characters. In this volume, Agent 711 and P.J. the mechanic shine through. ****1/4

  83. #183
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    I didn't get enough sleep, but I got plenty of rest. Lots of TV, lots of comics. I just finished Y - The Last Man, Vol. 5: Ring of Truth, which also marks the halfway point in the series. Some of the questions are finally answered, and one of the main characters goes missing. They make it to San Francisco after two years, only to find something else going wrong.



    I'm reading Y - The Last Man like eating popcorn, and Vol. 5 is a better-than-average edition. It's also a bit longer than its predecessors, at nearly 200 pages. The science behind why Yorick survives the plague is the highlight of this TPB, and it's a riotously clever idea. ****1/2

  84. #184
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Bone, Book 5: Rockjaw, Master of the Eastern Border was up next. At 112 pages, it's the shortest book so far out of the collection. Book 6 is also pretty short. Rockjaw is a giant mountain lion who preaches moral relativism. Echoing Nietzsche, he says, "there is no good or evil." Fone and Smiley Bone are stuck up on Rockjaw's mountain ridge with the baby rat creature, the three opossums and a gang of orphaned creatures that stick together.



    This is another fine book in the series, the strength of which is Rockjaw (Axiom saying "Lockjaw") possibly having to choose sides. He says over and over again that you're either with the rat creatures or with the dragons, yet he hates both of the groups. Just when I thought the series couldn't get any cuter, the orphans came along. Seriously, I was so relieved when they didn't go off into some hokey Christian metaphysical journey. This really is a contest for resources, and I couldn't help but sympathize with the rat creatures. ****1/4

  85. #185
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Bone, Book 6: Old Man's Cave is the turning point in the Bone epic. You finally get to find out who one of the main antagonists is, and a fair amount is revealed. Rockjaw (or Roque Ja) finally picks sides, and the reason why they're after Phoney Bone becomes apparent. You also learn about the Bones' childhood.



    It puzzled me why the rat creatures were after Phoney Bone, and what happens is simply classic. Book 6 is engaging and mysterious. I can't wait to find out what happens in the 7th, 8th and 9th books. ****1/2

  86. #186
    If you really enjoy Bone, you can get the complete collection in a single volume. It's not in color, but you could pass along the color ones to Cinco and not worry about them getting lost or damaged.

  87. #187
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Yeah, I have the one-volume edition. I got it back in March, and I finally got around to reading it. I actually prefer the black-and-white because for the full color edition, some of the dialogue has been shortened.

  88. #188
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    I just finished Y - The Last Man, Vol. 6: Girl on Girl. As the cover indicates, the sexual tension between Dr. Mann and Agent 355 comes to the forefront. Meanwhile, Ampersand is still missing, and the three hitch a ride on a cargo vessel headed for Japan, where the ninja, Toyota, took Ampersand.



    This volume is more about relationships than adventure, but there's an interesting story I won't give away. ****1/2

  89. #189
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Read Y - The Last Man, Vol. 7: Paper Dolls. The search for Ampersand continues. This was funnier that the previous outings, and I might just finish the whole series today. ****1/2


  90. #190
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Y - The Last Man, Vol 8: Kimono Dragons was solid, like the others. ****1/2

  91. #191
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Y - The Last Man, Vol 9: Motherland was good. ****1/4


  92. #192
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    ***** Wonderful collection. My edition of the 10th volume had pages 98-120 printed twice with a bunch of pages missing, so I got the series off torrent and finished it.



    Oh, and "wherefore" means "why."

  93. #193
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Finishing Y - The Last Man has left me a little depressed, and I haven't been able to start anything new so far today. Here's what I'm interested in reading/finishing:
    • Sandman by Neil Gaiman
    • Saga by Brian K. Vaughan
    • Ex Machina by Brian K. Vaughan
    • The Stand by Stephen King
    • Daredevil by Kevin Smith
    • Bone by Jeff Smith
    • Daytripper by Fabio Moon and Gabriel Ba
    • Planet Hulk by Greg Pak

  94. #194
    You need to get your hands on Celluloid by Dave McKean.

  95. #195
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    I know McKean vaguely from the Sandman series I've been trying to get around to reading. Celluloid looks interesting; right now the only comic erotica I'm reading is Milo Manara. I have the first of his three-volume, hardcover Erotica series, and I gave ***** to his collaboration with Alejandro Jodoworsky, Borgia, which is coming out in hardcover in November.

    I've ordered Bone: Rose by Jeff Smith, Low Moon by Jason and Daredevil by Kevin Smith off Amazon.com. I do still download comics. I have the complete run of D.C.'s New 52 comics and download the new ones every week. But I'm trying not to. The only problem is that from Thursday through Saturday, I read a good $80 or $90 worth of comics. I simply don't have the funds to keep that up. I downloaded Stephen King's The Stand in comic book form. The OHC is a fucking hundred dollars. I like to support comics, but that's too much.

  96. #196
    I'm fond of McKean because I enjoy his mixed-media style.

  97. #197
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Stephen King's The Stand, Vol. 1: Captain Trips costs as little as $4 on Amazon.com, including shipping. It's the story of a flu pandemic that kills 99.4% of the Earth's population. The people who survive join in a battle of good vs. evil. The scope is epic, and the topic is terrifying.



    ... and the characters, which Stephen King so meticulously created over a-thousand-some-odd pages, just plain suck in the first volume of this 750-page comic adaptation. King has his faults as a writer, and while his characters don't always go anywhere, he's usually able to establish them pretty well. I simply didn't care about one single person in this TPB, didn't like one and didn't dislike one. **1/2

  98. #198
    Ronald McDonald Fists of Palm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by This Fucking Place View Post
    I'm fond of McKean because I enjoy his mixed-media style.
    I liked his pencils in The Graveyard Book.

  99. #199
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    Bone, Vol. 7: Ghost Circles begins the final third of the series. The Bone cousins, Thorn and Grandma Ben have to escape the rat creatures when they come across an old friend, Bartleby, the baby rat creature. Bartleby isn't happy about living with the other rat creatures, and he runs away again. The six of them have to be careful of ghost circles, which are areas where reality is bent. If you go in one of them, you don't get out.



    What actually makes the ghost circles "ghost circles" isn't well defined, and this is one of the weaker volumes since the beginning of the series. Perhaps the book starts to take itself too seriously, but the characters and their motivations are still very strongly defined. ***3/4

  100. #200
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    Rubio, did you already cover Preacher?


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